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Allen Drewes, St. Charles, IL Loan Officer

Allen Drewes

St. Charles, IL Loan Officer

Our Promise

At Cherry Creek Mortgage Co., Inc., there are no gimmicks. We value people above all else. We believe the best mortgage outcomes start with the best people.

For every customer and partner who walks through the door, we make this promise and we stick to it.

Our Vision

We play a significant role in serving America’s home ownership needs. In this process, we aspire to meet and exceed your expectations by delivering specialized services to help you find the right loan that meets your specific needs. We strongly believe, that this kind of service should be the standard for excellence in the mortgage industry.

FAQ

How do I know what type of mortgage is best for me?

There is no simple formula to determine the type of mortgage that is best for you. This choice depends on a number of factors, including your current financial picture and how long you intend to keep your house. Cherry Creek Mortgage can help you evaluate your choices and help you make the most appropriate decision.

What does my mortgage payment include?

For most homeowners, the monthly mortgage payments include three separate parts:

Principal: Repayment on the amount borrowed

Interest: Payment to the lender for the amount borrowed

Taxes & Insurance: Monthly payments are normally made into a special escrow account for items like mortgage insurance, hazard insurance, and property taxes. This feature is sometimes optional, in which case the fees will be paid by you directly to the County Tax Assessor and property insurance company.

What happens once I am pre-approved?

You are ready to buy a home! After you receive your pre-approval, it’s very important to inform us of any changes to your financial picture or credit history as this could impact the amount or type of loan for which you’ll qualify once your loan is fully underwritten.

When should I consider refinancing?

Many different factors need to be analyzed to determine if refinancing is right for you, such as the length of time you intend to stay in your home, the type of loan you currently hold, or whether you’re currently paying monthly mortgage insurance. We are always happy to provide a recommendation for your particular circumstances.

Why do I have to submit so much paperwork?

We are often asked why there is so much paperwork mandated by the bank for a mortgage loan application when buying a home today. It seems that the bank needs to know everything about us and requires three separate sources to validate each-and-every entry on the application form.

Many buyers are being told by friends and family that the process was a hundred times easier when they bought their home ten to twenty years ago.

There are two very good reasons that the loan process is much more onerous on today’s buyer than perhaps any time in history.

  1. The government has set new guidelines that now demand that the bank prove beyond any doubt that you are indeed capable of affording the mortgage.

During the run-up in the housing market, many people ‘qualified’ for mortgages that they could never pay back. This led to millions of families losing their home. The government wants to make sure this can’t happen again.

  1. The banks don’t want to be in the real estate business.

Over the last seven years, banks were forced to take on the responsibility of liquidating millions of foreclosures and also negotiating another million plus short sales. Just like the government, they don’t want more foreclosures. For that reason, they need to double (maybe even triple) check everything on the application.

However, there is some good news in the situation. The housing crash that mandated that banks be extremely strict on paperwork requirements also allows you to get a mortgage interest rate as low as 3.43%, the latest reported rate from Freddie Mac.

The friends and family who bought homes ten or twenty years ago experienced a simpler mortgage application process but also paid a higher interest rate (the average 30 year fixed rate mortgage was 8.12% in the 1990’s and 6.29% in the 2000’s). If you went to the bank and offered to pay 7% instead of less than 4%, they would probably bend over backwards to make the process much easier.

Bottom Line

Instead of concentrating on the additional paperwork required, let’s be thankful that we are able to buy a home at historically low rates.