CCMC on Facebook
Doug Ridder, Grand Junction, CO Mortgage Loan Officer

Doug Ridder

Grand Junction, CO Mortgage Loan Officer

Our Promise

At Cherry Creek Mortgage Co., Inc., there are no gimmicks. We value people above all else. We believe the best mortgage outcomes start with the best people.

For every customer and partner who walks through the door, we make this promise and we stick to it.

Our Vision

We play a significant role in serving America’s home ownership needs. In this process, we aspire to meet and exceed your expectations by delivering specialized services to help you find the right loan that meets your specific needs. We strongly believe, that this kind of service should be the standard for excellence in the mortgage industry.

FAQ

If I’m building a new home instead of purchasing an existing home, what should I know?

All new construction may require a Certificate of Occupancy (CO) once the home has been inspected and it’s determined to be move-in ready. FHA requires lenders to wait until the CO is issued before a loan application can be taken. The first step is to get a Pre-Approval letter from us prior to going into contract with the builder. Please make sure to get us in touch with the builder so we can verify everything needed in the contract.

What are eligible property types?

Only 1- to 4-family dwelling units on which construction has been completed are eligible for the HECM for Purchase program. Loan proceeds may be used to satisfy outstanding payment obligations associated with a land contract, contract for deed, or other similar purchasing arrangements that will ensure the property, which will be used as collateral for the HECM. The collateral must be on real estate held in fee simple. If property is held in leasehold, then additional restrictions may apply.

What are ineligible property types?

Cooperative units

Newly constructed principal residences where a Certificate of Occupancy or its equivalent has not been issued by the appropriate local authority

Boarding houses

Bed and breakfast establishments

Existing manufactured homes built before June 15, 1976

Existing manufactured homes built after June 15, 1976, that fail to conform to the Manufactured Home Construction Safety Standards, as evidenced by affixed certification labels (e.g., data plate and HUD certification label) and/or lack a permanent foundation as required in HUD’s Permanent Foundations for Manufactured Housing Guide

What is the difference between a fixed-rate loan and an adjustable-rate loan?

With a fixed-rate mortgage, the interest rate stays the same during the life of the loan. With an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), the interest rate can change after a specified period of time. While the monthly payments that you make with a fixed-rate mortgage are relatively stable, payments on an ARM loan will likely change. There are advantages and disadvantages to each type of mortgage, and the best way to select a loan product is by talking to us.

Why do I have to submit so much paperwork?

We are often asked why there is so much paperwork mandated by the bank for a mortgage loan application when buying a home today. It seems that the bank needs to know everything about us and requires three separate sources to validate each-and-every entry on the application form.

Many buyers are being told by friends and family that the process was a hundred times easier when they bought their home ten to twenty years ago.

There are two very good reasons that the loan process is much more onerous on today’s buyer than perhaps any time in history.

  1. The government has set new guidelines that now demand that the bank prove beyond any doubt that you are indeed capable of affording the mortgage.

During the run-up in the housing market, many people ‘qualified’ for mortgages that they could never pay back. This led to millions of families losing their home. The government wants to make sure this can’t happen again.

  1. The banks don’t want to be in the real estate business.

Over the last seven years, banks were forced to take on the responsibility of liquidating millions of foreclosures and also negotiating another million plus short sales. Just like the government, they don’t want more foreclosures. For that reason, they need to double (maybe even triple) check everything on the application.

However, there is some good news in the situation. The housing crash that mandated that banks be extremely strict on paperwork requirements also allows you to get a mortgage interest rate as low as 3.43%, the latest reported rate from Freddie Mac.

The friends and family who bought homes ten or twenty years ago experienced a simpler mortgage application process but also paid a higher interest rate (the average 30 year fixed rate mortgage was 8.12% in the 1990’s and 6.29% in the 2000’s). If you went to the bank and offered to pay 7% instead of less than 4%, they would probably bend over backwards to make the process much easier.

Bottom Line

Instead of concentrating on the additional paperwork required, let’s be thankful that we are able to buy a home at historically low rates.

Search for Your Next Home powered by HomeScout/HBM2