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Lizzie Boetzelen , Denver, CO Senior Mortgage Loan Officer

Lizzie Boetzelen

Denver, CO Senior Mortgage Loan Officer

Our Promise

At Cherry Creek Mortgage Co., Inc., there are no gimmicks. We value people above all else. We believe the best mortgage outcomes start with the best people.

For every customer and partner who walks through the door, we make this promise and we stick to it.

Our Vision

We play a significant role in serving America’s home ownership needs. In this process, we aspire to meet and exceed your expectations by delivering specialized services to help you find the right loan that meets your specific needs. We strongly believe, that this kind of service should be the standard for excellence in the mortgage industry.

FAQ

What happens once I am pre-approved?

You are ready to buy a home! After you receive your pre-approval, it’s very important to inform us of any changes to your financial picture or credit history as this could impact the amount or type of loan for which you’ll qualify once your loan is fully underwritten.

What is mortgage insurance?

Mortgage insurance is generally required in one form or another when the down payment is less than 20%, and it protects the lender in the event of loan default. The lower the down payment, the higher the risk for the lender, and thus the higher the monthly mortgage insurance premium. Depending on your particular situation, there may be loan options available that either don’t require monthly mortgage insurance payments or allow your monthly mortgage insurance payments to be dropped at some point in the future.

(Disclaimer: *BPMI = Borrower Paid Mortgage Insurance; LPMI = Lender Paid Mortgage Insurance. LPMI may not be cancelled by the borrower; it terminates only when the loan is refinanced or paid off, and it usually results in a loan with a higher interest rate than BPMI unless discount points are added to lower the rate. BPMI may be cancelled or terminated when the loan reaches 80% of the original value of the property.)

What is the difference between a fixed-rate loan and an adjustable-rate loan?

With a fixed-rate mortgage, the interest rate stays the same during the life of the loan. With an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), the interest rate can change after a specified period of time. While the monthly payments that you make with a fixed-rate mortgage are relatively stable, payments on an ARM loan will likely change. There are advantages and disadvantages to each type of mortgage, and the best way to select a loan product is by talking to us.

When should I consider refinancing?

Many different factors need to be analyzed to determine if refinancing is right for you, such as the length of time you intend to stay in your home, the type of loan you currently hold, or whether you’re currently paying monthly mortgage insurance. We are always happy to provide a recommendation for your particular circumstances.

Why does it take so long to get a loan?

There are some common scenarios that can lead to a longer processing time. Here are some factors that might cause a mortgage lender to take a relatively long time with processing.

  1. New mortgage rules require more verification.

In 2014, a new set of mortgage rules took effect, and they’ve had an impact on how lenders originate home loans. The Ability-to-Repay rule, for example, requires mortgage companies to thoroughly verify and document a borrower’s financial ability to repay the loan. As a result of these and other government regulations, mortgage lenders might take a long time to process and approve loans (longer than in the past, anyway.)

  1. There are lots of players and paperwork involved.

When you apply for a home loan, your application and paperwork might pass through the hands of half-a-dozen different people (or even more, if you use one of the “big banks”). Loan officers, processors and underwriters, oh my! And additional documents might be requested at each stage. Think of a snowball getting larger as it rolls downhill.

This is another reason why mortgage lenders can take a long time when processing loans. There are many steps in the process, many documents to review, and several different people involved.

Granted, some lenders have made big advancements with streamlining in recent years. This is especially true for those companies that put an emphasis on technology, web-based applications, and the like. But by and large, it’s still a cumbersome process with lots of paperwork along the way.

  1. Underwriters often request additional documents.

Home loan applications go through several screening processes. Underwriting is the most intense review. This is when the mortgage lender’s underwriter (or underwriting department) reviews all paperwork relating to the loan, the borrower, and the property being purchased.

Underwriters often request additional documents during this stage, including letters of explanation from the borrower. It’s another reason why mortgage lenders take so long to approve loans.

  1. Home appraisals and title searches can delay the process.

In a standard residential real estate transaction, the buyer’s mortgage lender will have the home appraised to determine its current market value. Additionally, a title company will usually step in to verify the seller’s right to sell (and transfer ownership of) the property.

Sometimes these things go smoothly — other times they don’t. For instance, the appraiser might decide the home is worth less than what the buyer has agreed to pay (in the purchase agreement). This can delay or even derail the mortgage process. The title company might have to find and fix problems relating to the title. All of this can make the process take longer.

Sometimes It All Goes Smoothly Let’s end on a positive note. I don’t want to give you the false impression that mortgage lending is always a slow process. Sometimes it moves quickly and smoothly, with no hang-ups or obstacles along the way.

Some lenders can process an application and approve a borrower in 7 – 10 days. This is especially true when there are no underwriting issues or conditions to resolve.

But if the mortgage company has a backlog of applications, and/or the borrower has a host of financial and paperwork issues, it can take a relatively longer time.